Local Lore: Emoriland Park

Emoriland Park began with the development of Fairmont & Emoriland Blvd. during the 1920's. Charles M. Emory converted his father's farm, the family farm, Arlington Gardens, then in the community of Arlington, into the neighborhood.

Tudor Style Home on Emoriland Blvd

Tudor Style Home on Emoriland Blvd

Charles Emory's father Reverend Isaac Emory, famous for development of Sunday Schools locally and around the state, especially in rural areas, had been honored by the renaming of the Central Market to Emory Place following his death in 1904. He died in the famous New Market Wreck, in which two Southern Railway trains collided in New Market, killing more than 56 people and injuring more than 106 people.

Charles Emory home, 1517 Emoriland Blvd

Charles Emory home, 1517 Emoriland Blvd

Charles M. Emory sold vegetables in Arlington Gardens, which featured hot houses. The family home was located near the entrance of Fairmont & Emoriland boulevards, on Broadway. 

Emory's operation continued until his land was annexed by the city, along with adjacent neighborhoods, in 1917. Higher overhead for his business with city taxes seemingly forced Emory into the real estate game. He developed the streets, with the grassy center median on Emoriland Blvd., and auctioned lots, beginning in 1924.

One of the earliest homes in the neighborhood, 1723 Emoriland Blvd, Craftsman Style

One of the earliest homes in the neighborhood, 1723 Emoriland Blvd, Craftsman Style

Most of the first homes in the neighborhood were concentrated in the area between Monmouth and Kuhlman streets on Emoriland Blvd. Among the first homes were 1700, 1706, 1717, 1723, 1726, and 1736 Emoriland Blvd.; originally  numbered 200, 202, 205, 207, 208, and 212 Emoriland Blvd.) Early residents of the neighborhood were mostly a variety of professional service people, including managers, salesmen, and local business owners.

One of the earliest homes in the neighborhood, 1717 Emoriland Blvd, Tudor Style Home

One of the earliest homes in the neighborhood, 1717 Emoriland Blvd, Tudor Style Home

Members of the  Emory family occupied the neighborhood. The Charles M. Emory family lived at 1517 Emoriland Blvd. Charles M. Emory died there in 1933, aged 72. His widow later lived at 1716 Emoriland Blvd. A son, William M. Emory, and family lived at 1730 Emoriland Blvd. during the early development of the neighborhood. Another son, Charles M. Emory, Jr. eventually lived at 1532 Emoriland Blvd.

The Emory family business became Emory Construction Company, run by Charles M. Emory and his sons. The construction company office was located across the street from Charles M. Emory's home at 1517 Emoriland Blvd. for some time.

Spanish Eclectic Style Home on Emoriland Blvd

Spanish Eclectic Style Home on Emoriland Blvd

The neighborhood expanded and met other neighborhoods as residential development of the city spread in spite of the Great Depression years. By 1930, about 43 houses had been built between Broadway and Belleview Street on Fairmont Blvd.; and, about 49 houses, between Broadway and Orlando Street, had been built on Emoriland Blvd.

Development of Fairmont Blvd., formerly known as Berkeley Street, was a little slower than Emoriland Blvd. Many of the houses on Fairmont Blvd. along with development in later blocks of Emoriland boulevards, were built in the 1930's and 40's. New construction commonly continued into the 1950's in the neighborhood.

A variety of historic house styles are included in the neighborhood. While Craftsman style, as seen in the neighborhood, was popular in earlier neighborhoods around town. Later versions of such styles as Tudor, Colonial, and, less common, Spanish Eclectic style would have reflected the latest trend to early buyers in the neighborhood. These styles were available in other contemporary neighborhoods, like North Hills, Island Home, Holston Hills, Lindbergh Forest, and Sequoyah Hills. Later ranch style homes of the middle of the twentieth century are also common in the neighborhood.